Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|shearluck|lewisoll@yahoo.co.uk|02/27/05 at 16:13:07|shearluck|xx|0|62.253.64.24|[quote]TIGER MYSTERY
By MARGARETTA POS
27feb05


A GERMAN visitor to Tasmania has taken several photographs of what appears to be a Tasmanian tiger.

The man's brother was in Hobart last week and showed the digital images to staff at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery.

He also showed them to Parks and Wildlife Service officers.

The shots were taken recently in the Lake St Clair region.

However, the German visitor did not leave any images for further study.

He has since left for Melbourne.

Last night TMAG marketing manager Peter West said the museum was unable to comment about the veracity of the images.

"All I can say is that the German was here last week," Mr West said.

"He was the brother of a visitor who took the photographs. There were images of a tiger in several of them.

"But the museum is not in a position to confirm whether they really are of a tiger.

"All I can say is that the photographs were brought to us. We don't have them and cannot comment about them."

The Tasmanian tiger is generally believed to be extinct.

The last tiger in the Hobart Zoo died in 1936.

Since then, there have been many reported sightings, but none has been verified.

Recently, a major project to clone a tiger at the Australian Museum in Sydney was axed because the DNA sample to be used was not good enough.

[url]http://www.themercury.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,12385481%255E921,00.html[/url]

the sunday tasmanian 2005
[/quote]

Hmm, no pictures left behind, or even copys made?

To me it sounds like a photoshopped hoax or a misidentifacation by the tourist. but, I would like to be proved wrong :)||02/27/05 at 16:16:17|shearluck Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Min_Bannister|alison.ayres@gmail.com|02/28/05 at 12:50:32|min_bannister|xx|0|129.215.140.68|Apparently the photographs have turned up and are being examined as we speak.
[quote]MYSTERIOUS photographs at the centre of the latest Tasmanian tiger sightings contain a thylacine, experts agree.

Two senior Tasmanian figures who were asked to inspect the photographs last week agree - the blurry and partially obscured animal shown is unmistakably a thylacine.
The photographs included the distinctive stripes Tasmanian tigers were renowned for, the pair said yesterday.

It now comes down to whether the images, snapped by a digital camera, can be proven to be authentic.

The senior figures are Department of Primary Industries Nature Conservation Branch wildlife biologist Nick Mooney and Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery director Bill Bleathman.

They viewed the two photographs at the request of a Victorian man last week.

Mr Mooney has investigated hundreds of thylacine sightings.

It is claimed the pictures were taken by the Victorian man's brother, described only as a tourist from Germany, who was bushwalking in remote wilderness near Lake St Clair during recent weeks.

"I had an extensive look at the pictures," Mr Mooney said.

"It is clearly more likely a thylacine than any other animal, but the authenticity of the picture does pose some issues."

The photographs were not copied before they were taken back to Victoria.

But Mr Mooney and Mr Bleathman gave a detailed account of the images yesterday as they said an investigation would continue.

The pictures were described as:


"Out of focus" or motion-blurred, attributed to possible excitement at the discovery.

Showing an animal disappearing into bush about 20m away from the photographer.

The animal was mostly obscured except for part of its back, which appeared to show a Tasmanian tiger's distinctive stripes.

Parts of the head and tail were partially visible through the bushes.
"They showed the back of a thylacine but its head, hindquarters and tail were not clearly visible," Mr Bleathman said.

"We are always interested in these sightings because we have the world's experts on thylacines here, and we investigate all sightings to the best of our ability.

"We looked at the photographs and determined it was inconclusive. I'm not saying it's a hoax."

He said the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery received up to 10 thylacine sightings a year, but the latest was "the first one claiming to have a colour picture".

It is a harder task to authenticate a digital picture, which can be easily manipulated using computer programs, than an image snapped by a conventional camera.

It is understood the images are in the possession of Melbourne newspaper The Age, but they had not been published yesterday.

Tasmanian tigers are generally considered to have become extinct in the wild about 1933, when the last wild thylacine was caught in the Florentine Valley.

The last known Tasmanian tiger died in Hobart's former zoo in 1936.

Mr Mooney said yesterday it was possible the species could have remained undiscovered, living in small pockets in Tasmania's most remote wilderness, as it was resilient to in-breeding.

"It is possible but I think it is against the odds ... I'm open-minded," he said.

Premier Paul Lennon said more study of the images was needed.

"Obviously if their sighting can be authenticated then it would be great news for Tasmania," Mr Lennon said.
[/quote]
http://www.news.com.au/story/0,10117,12394117-1244,00.html
|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Min_Bannister|alison.ayres@gmail.com|03/02/05 at 22:25:09|min_bannister|xx|0|213.48.109.195|Hmm. Apparentlly the pictures are very similar to some found in a German book..

[quote] A VICTORIAN man at the centre of the recent Tasmanian Tiger mystery has gone to ground after being "spooked" by the amount of attention his photographs have received.

Tasmanian wildlife biologist Nick Mooney said he last heard from the man on Monday after he rang saying he was annoyed at the amount of media attention the photos had received.

"It appears he has been spooked and has gone to ground," Mr Mooney said. "It's still a bit of a mystery."

It has been claimed that the pictures were taken by the man's brother, described as a German tourist, while on a recent bushwalk in Tasmania.

"I can get in touch with him anytime I like but I want to keep him onside and not annoy him," Mr Mooney said.

     

     
     

On Monday Mr Mooney, who is a leading Tasmanian wildlife biologist, said the man's account of the sighting -- and the two photographs submitted as proof -- amounted to one of the most convincing cases for the species' survival that he had seen.

"I still believe it is worth pursuing to find out if it is authentic," he said.

"It would be nice if we could prove it or disprove it in Tasmania."

The man might be considering selling the photos to the highest bidder.

"That would be an obvious outcome," Mr Mooney said.

Mr Mooney said the picture of the Tasmanian Tiger is similar to pictures in a German book by Hans Moeller about the thylacine.

Mr Mooney has a copy of the book but is not prepared to show it to the media to avoid talk about a hoax.

Midcity Cameraworld owner Wolfgang Becker said it is easy to make a fake digital photograph or manipulate them.

"You can go into Photoshop and do what you want with your photos," he said.

"It can be done in 15 minutes and is very difficult to tell if it's a fake." [/quote]

http://www.themercury.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,12417425%255E3462,00.html|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Richard_F|richard@cfz.org.uk|03/10/05 at 13:23:58|richard_f|xx|0|81.154.199.136|From The Mercury (Hobart, Tasmania):
Tiger photos sought by state
Danny Rose
March 01, 2005

THE Victorian man at the centre of the thylacine mystery was urged yesterday to release his hotly debated photographs for forensic examination.

The Tasmania Government said a letter would be sent to the man, urging him to "break his silence and make further contact with the state that the tiger called home".

This came as leading Tasmanian wildlife biologist Nick Mooney said the man's account of the sighting - and two photographs submitted as proof - amounted to one of the most convincing cases for the species' survival that he had seen.

But the fundamental question of whether the digital images could be authenticated came no closer to being answered yesterday.

Acting Environment Minister Steve Kons said the Government and all Tasmanians were keen for answers.

"I appreciate that the man has come forward and contacted the scientists in the state initially but we need him now to release the images for further analysis," said Mr Kons, adding it was equally possible it was a hoax.

It has been claimed the pictures were taken by the man's brother, described as a German tourist, while on a recent bushwalk in Tasmania.

Mr Mooney, as part of the Department of Primary Industries' Nature Conservation Branch, said he was in contact with the man.

Mr Mooney has investigated hundreds of thylacine sightings for the State Government and yesterday said this case was "particularly exciting".

"Even without the pictures involved, it was quite a detailed report as far as the animal goes," he said.

Mr Mooney said he would not reveal the identity of the man to allow independent questioning by the media.

Mr Mooney was part of the team of experts called to the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery last week to inspect the photographs.

The team decided the animal pictured, though partially obscured, was unmistakably a thylacine.


|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Richard_F|richard@cfz.org.uk|03/10/05 at 13:38:44|richard_f|xx|0|81.154.199.136|Excitement over Tasmanian Tiger sighting

The World Today - Monday, 28 February , 2005  12:42:00
Reporter: Annie Guest

KAREN PERCY: When is extinction really extinction? It might be 69 years since the last confirmed sighting of the Tasmanian Tiger, but authorities are enthusiastic about the latest glimpse of the striped marsupial.

A German tourist claims to have taken digital photographs of the grey, wolf-like creature, while visiting Lake St Clair in the State's Wilderness World Heritage Area.

Authorities have confirmed the image is of a Tasmanian Tiger, but the authenticity of the photographs has yet to be established.

From Hobart, Annie Guest has the story.

ANNIE GUEST: The two digital photographs have come to light in such a mysterious way that it would be easy to dismiss it as a grab for limelight or cash.

A man claiming to be the brother of a German tourist who took the photographs approached The Age newspaper, which flew him to Tasmania so experts could examine his photographs.

The man would not allow the Department of Primary Industries to copy the images to examine their authenticity, but Biologist Nick Mooney remains enthused.

NICK MOONEY: The brother of the person who claims to have taken the pictures brought the pictures down to Hobart and a few members of staff of the museum and myself examined the pictures, then they took them away again.

ANNIE GUEST: That seems a bit strange, first of all that the brother came and not the person who actually took the photographs.

NICK MOONEY: They have their own reasons no doubt.

ANNIE GUEST: Why wouldn't they give you the photographs to copy?

NICK MOONEY: They have their own reasons, and presumably they may be to do with copyright on the photos and money.

ANNIE GUEST: Can you describe what you saw in these photographs?

NICK MOONEY: In the picture we can see some features of a thylacine, enough that the image is to me quite clearly a thylacine, whether the picture is authentic or not is a completely different issue.

ANNIE GUEST: But how can you even entertain the idea that these photos are authentic when the last positive sighting of a Tasmanian tiger was 1936 and it was officially declared extinct in 1986?

NICK MOONEY: Oh, it's a long shot, but you can have a combination of circumstances where some species can linger on to quite extraordinary lengths. As time goes on, without absolute proof, the possibility just becomes remote.

ANNIE GUEST: What would it mean to science, and to the species if this did turn out to be a positive sighting?

NICK MOONEY: Oh, it would be extremely exciting for science, I'm not sure what good it might do the species, but it would be extremely exciting for Tasmania as a whole and Australia and the world would be very excited.

ANNIE GUEST: If this is a Tasmanian Tiger, the species would be breeding from a very small gene pool.

NICK MOONEY: No, this species, if it is a Tasmanian Tiger, the species should be exactly the same as it ever was, perhaps with some reduced genetic diversity. But if the species has survived 'til now, it's obviously got considerable reserves and resistance to all sorts of problems.

ANNIE GUEST: There was a cloning project that was recently canned for the Tasmanian Tiger. This could make that irrelevant.

NICK MOONEY: Um, yes, um, if the species exists in the wild, the cloning project's irrelevant.

ANNIE GUEST: Where are the photographs now?

NICK MOONEY: I don't know where the photographs are. The last I saw them they were in possession of the person who took them's brother.

ANNIE GUEST: So therefore is Tasmania at risk of losing these photographs perhaps to another museum?

NICK MOONEY: Oh these people have all the control over these photographs, the people who took them. It's quite possible we will never see them again. It's quite possible they might pop up in the media in Europe or anywhere.

ANNIE GUEST: Biologist Nick Mooney from the Department of Primary Industries.

So, will the Tasmanian Museum be entering a bidding war to ensure it's in the running for these photographs?

The Museum's Director, Bill Bleathman is certainly not rushing to make an offer.

BILL BLEATHMAN: If the owner of the photograph doesn't want to give the photograph to us then the photograph is now with a mainland newspaper as far as we're aware. There isn't a great deal we can do about it other than ask to speak to the person that took it and ask for a copy of it.

KAREN BARLOW: Director of the Tasmanian Museum, Bill Bleathman, ending that report from Annie Guest in Hobart.


|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Richard_F|richard@cfz.org.uk|03/10/05 at 14:02:09|richard_f|xx|0|81.154.199.136|Tiger photos sought by state
By DANNY ROSE

01mar05
THE Victorian man at the centre of the thylacine mystery was urged yesterday to release his hotly debated photographs for forensic examination.

The State Government said a letter would be sent to the man, urging him to "break his silence and make further contact with the state that the tiger called home".

This came as leading Tasmanian wildlife biologist Nick Mooney said the man's account of the sighting -- and two photographs submitted as proof -- amounted to one of the most convincing cases for the species' survival that he had seen.

But the fundamental question of whether the digital images could be authenticated came no closer to being answered yesterday.

Acting Environment Minister Steve Kons said the Government and all Tasmanians were keen for answers.

"I appreciate that the man has come forward and contacted the scientists in the state initially but we need him now to release the images for further analysis," said Mr Kons, adding it was equally possible it was a hoax.

It has been claimed the pictures were taken by the man's brother, described as a German tourist, while on a recent bushwalk in Tasmania.

Mr Mooney, as part of the Department of Primary Industries' Nature Conservation Branch, said he was in contact with the man.

Mr Mooney has investigated hundreds of thylacine sightings for the State Government and yesterday said this case was "particularly exciting".

"Even without the pictures involved, it was quite a detailed report as far as the animal goes," he said.

Mr Mooney said he would not reveal the identity of the man to allow independent questioning by the media.

Mr Mooney was part of the team of experts called to the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery last week to inspect the photographs.

The team decided the animal pictured, though partially obscured, was unmistakably a thylacine.






|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Richard_F|richard@cfz.org.uk|03/10/05 at 14:05:18|richard_f|xx|0|81.154.199.136|Tassie tiger spotters likely to be 'sadly mistaken'
Tuesday, 1 March 2005

A Tasmanian tiger researcher is sceptical about photographs purported to be of the officially extinct creature.

Forensic experts have been unable to rule out digital manipulation of the photographs, which contain images of the thylacine.

The photographs have alleged been taken near Lake St Clair.

Tiger researcher Col Bailey says the tiger has never been photographed in the wild.

Mr Bailey says the latest publicised sighting could easily be a stunt.

"I probably get 20 or so a year and out of those you may be get five worthy of investigation and you prune it down from there you get very few that warrant a closer look," he said.

"Many people believe they've really seen a tiger, but they're mistaken, sadly mistaken."

The owners of the camera have so far refused to produce original copies for forensic experts so they can rule out any digital manipulation of the image.



|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Richard_F|richard@cfz.org.uk|03/10/05 at 14:06:45|richard_f|xx|0|81.154.199.136|Tiger photos sought by state
THE Victorian man at the centre of the thylacine mystery was urged
yesterday to release his hotly debated photographs for forensic
examination.
The State Government said a letter would be sent to the man, urging him
to "break his silence and make further contact with the state that the
tiger called home".
This came as leading Tasmanian wildlife biologist Nick Mooney said the
man's account of the sighting -- and two photographs submitted as proof
-- amounted to one of the most convincing cases for the species'
survival that he had seen.
<snip>


http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200503/s1312984.htm
Speculation mounts over tassie tiger photos

http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2005/s1312642.htm
Excitement over Tasmanian Tiger sighting
ANNIE GUEST: The two digital photographs have come to light in such a
mysterious way that it would be easy to dismiss it as a grab for
limelight or cash.
A man claiming to be the brother of a German tourist who took the
photographs approached The Age newspaper, which flew him to Tasmania so
experts could examine his photographs.
The man would not allow the Department of Primary Industries to copy the
images to examine their authenticity, but Biologist Nick Mooney remains
enthused.
NICK MOONEY: The brother of the person who claims to have taken the
pictures brought the pictures down to Hobart and a few members of staff
of the museum and myself examined the pictures, then they took them away
again.
ANNIE GUEST: That seems a bit strange, first of all that the brother
came and not the person who actually took the photographs.
NICK MOONEY: They have their own reasons no doubt.
ANNIE GUEST: Why wouldn't they give you the photographs to copy?
NICK MOONEY: They have their own reasons, and presumably they may be to
do with copyright on the photos and money.
ANNIE GUEST: Can you describe what you saw in these photographs?
NICK MOONEY: In the picture we can see some features of a thylacine,
enough that the image is to me quite clearly a thylacine, whether the
picture is authentic or not is a completely different issue.
<snip>

http://www.themercury.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,12403957%255E3462,00.html
Tracker insists tigers alive
NEW Norfolk's Col Bailey has been waiting almost 40 years for the
Tasmanian tiger to be declared not extinct.
The author and 38-year veteran of thylacine searches says he has found,
and seen, enough to convince him of the species' survival in remote
Tasmanian wilderness.
But Mr Bailey, 67, is a sceptic when it comes to the two pictures of a
thylacine supposedly snapped near Lake St Clair in recent weeks.
He said Tasmanian tigers could be living undetected in that area but he
gives little credence to the digital photographs.
"I've seen this sort of thing before," Mr Bailey said yesterday.
"You can manipulate a digital image fairly easily and they shot through
pretty quickly. There's a lot of holes in this story."
<snip>

etc., etc.  Apparently no more is really known at this time but it's News.

|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Richard_F|richard@cfz.org.uk|03/10/05 at 14:49:56|richard_f|xx|0|81.154.199.136|Like Pedder, tiger disappears

03mar05

BOB Brown, who spent a year searching for the Tasmanian Tiger in the 1970s, is not getting too excited by the latest possible photo evidence.

"I came to Tasmania to see two things many years ago _ the original Lake Pedder and a thylacine _ and I'm afraid they are both gone," Senator Brown said yesterday.

"During a year of searching in 1972, we met several people who were sure they had sighted a tiger but were put off by the publicity which may have come their way."

Senator Brown said it would be exciting news for people if genuine photographic evidence became available but not such good news for the tiger, given the frenzy which would ensue.

"I remember we once photographed a mutant dog, which was a greyhound with stripes and had some excitement at the time," he said.


"We are more likely to see such an animal than the Tasmanian tiger in the bush."

He believed it was extinct.





|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Richard_F|richard@cfz.org.uk|03/10/05 at 14:58:32|richard_f|xx|0|81.154.199.136|Opportunity in tiger tales|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Richard_F|richard@cfz.org.uk|03/10/05 at 14:58:54|richard_f|xx|0|81.154.199.136|Opportunity in tiger tales

THE mythical Loch Ness Monster has given Scottish tourism a huge boost over the decades.

There is no reason why the thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger, could not do the same for us.

No matter how dodgy the pictures or how unlikely the "eyewitness" reports, we find ourselves tempted to nod our heads and agree that the creature still exists somewhere out there.

The yeti, the bigfoot, the Victorian panther ... they have all developed into industries.

They draw researchers and others keen to see if there is truth behind the myths.

Tasmania could tap into this trend in a big way.

The tiger could potentially serve a higher economic good in extinction, than it ever could have when thousands of thylacines were roaming the State.

As often as possible, we should be looking to suggest it exists, or even reporting sightings, no matter how silly.

It would be great for tourism.

Photos allegedly taken of a thylacine by a German tourist were shown to Tasmanian wildlife experts last week.

There are thoughts they may be a digital hoax.

Surely not. We want to believe.





|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Richard_F|richard@cfz.org.uk|03/17/05 at 02:53:36|richard_f|xx|0|81.153.207.213|Proof of Tassie tiger photo seems extinct

LUKE SAYER
17mar05

A MYSTERIOUS Tasmanian tiger photo by a German tourist is looking more like a hoax than proof the famous marsupial is alive.

News of the photo emerged late last month when the man's brother in Victoria claimed to have a copy of the picture.

The colour photo was said to have been taken in remote wilderness near Lake St Clair.

But little has emerged to prove the photograph is genuine since it was first reported.

Leading Tasmanian wildlife biologist Nick Mooney said the process was ongoing.

"We are still trying to get information, but it is a little like pulling teeth," he said.

Mr Mooney was one of a small group of experts called to the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery last month to view the photo from the Victorian man, brother of the German photographer.

"I haven't seen the photos again, and don't know where they might be," Mr Mooney said.

"I have been spending my time trying to encourage them to get some type of forensic examination of the photo. Then we can take it further.

"I'm not part of any negotiations, it really is a waiting game.

"But there would be many advantages if they did get it verified."

Mr Mooney said there was no chance for him to keep a copy of the photo.

"We didn't even know anything about it until the guy was back on the mainland, and the day before he was going back to Germany."

Melbourne newspaper The Age is reported to have copies of the photo, but is yet to publish it.

The paper did not respond to a call to ask whether it was attempting to verify the authenticity of the picture.

Last month TMAG director Bill Bleathman, who viewed the photograph with Mr Mooney, said it showed the back of a thylacine but its head, hindquarters and tail were not clearly visible.

Mr Bleathman said they determined it was inconclusive but not necessarily a hoax.

Later, Mr Mooney said it was one of the most convincing cases for the species' survival that he had seen.

"It is possible, but I think it is against the odds ... I'm open-minded," he said.

The thylacine is considered to have become extinct in the wild about 1933, with the last known one dying in Hobart's former zoo in 1936.

http://www.themercury.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,12569181%255E3462,00.html
|| Re: Tazzie tiger photoed by tourist (allededly)|Richard_F|richard@cfz.org.uk|03/17/05 at 02:54:33|richard_f|xx|0|81.153.207.213|Even if it is a hoax that dosent mean that the Tazzy Wolf isnt still around||