Name that mystery beast...|selkie|fiddleinthesky@hotmail.com|01/31/08 at 22:07:34|selkie|xx|0|82.6.24.51|
Mystery creature

‘CYRIL’ the racoon has been rescued thanks to RSPCA inspectors.

The RSPCA rescued the coati after it was found in a chicken shed, on a farmyard, in Eskdale, Cumbria. It’s thought it might have been dumped.

The animal – which is a member of the racoon family but has a characteristic long snout – is native to South, Central and parts of North America. The species has been widely kept in zoos, animal menageries and private collections across the UK for years, but was recently taken off the list of animals for which licences are required.

A member of the public called the Society to report the find on Tuesday morning.

Animal collection officers David Hatton and Nick Green picked up the creature.

ACO Hatton said: “This animal was in a shed, on a farm, miles from anywhere in perfect physical condition. It’s possible that it’s an escapee but we’ve been in touch with all of the animal collectors we’re aware of in the area, and no one has come forward reporting it missing. It seems unlikely it got there on its own.”

After changes to the Dangerous Wild Animals Act 1976 schedule came into force last autumn the RSPCA went public with concerns there could be a rise in the number of animals, like coatis, being dumped by new owners, unable to properly care for them. “Obviously we don’t know for sure that’s the case here,” said ACO Hatton.

Looking after an animal like a coati requires a huge amount of commitment and specialist knowledge, and under the Animal Welfare Act which came into force last year, pet owners now have a duty of care to meet all their welfare needs.

It took the ACOs 20 minutes to collect the male animal - which is about the size of a large domestic cat - despite it being in an enclosed space.

ACO Green said: “It was a bit of a handful. Coatis have got a reputation for being pretty fierce when the need arises so there was no way we were getting our hands too close to it.” A ‘grasper’ had to be used to catch the animal safely.

Trotters Animal Park in Cockermouth, Cumbria, have taken the animal, now named Cyril, in on a short-term basis.

Anyone who knows where it might have come from should contact the RSPCA on 0300 1234 999.

http://www.whitehaven-news.co.uk/news/viewarticle.aspx?id=590591|| Rare racoon rescued from Eskdale farm|selkie|fiddleinthesky@hotmail.com|01/31/08 at 22:08:20|selkie|xx|0|82.6.24.51|‘CYRIL’ the Coati has been rescued from Eskdale, thanks to RSPCA inspectors.

It was rescued from a chicken shed, on a farmyard, where it is thought it might have been dumped.

The animal – which is a member of the racoon family but has a characteristic long snout – is native to South, Central and parts of North America.

The species has been widely kept in zoos, animal menageries and private collections across the UK for years, but was recently taken off the list of animals for which licences are required .

A member of the public called the Society to report the find on TuesdayJanuary 22 .

Animal collection officers (ACOs) David Hatton and Nick Green were charged with collecting it. ACO Hatton said: “This animal was in a shed, on a farm, miles from anywhere in perfect physical condition. It’s possible that it’s an escapee but we’ve been in touch with all of the animal collectors we’re aware of in the area, and no one has come forward reporting it missing. It seems unlikely it got there on its own.”

After changes to the Dangerous Wild Animals Act 1976 schedule came into force last autumn the RSPCA went public with concerns there could be a rise in the number of animals, like coatis, being dumped by new owners, unable to properly care for them. “Obviously we don’t know for sure that’s the case here,” said ACO Hatton.

Looking after an animal like a coati requires a huge amount of commitment and specialist knowledge, and under the Animal Welfare Act which came into force last year, pet owners now have a duty of care to meet all their welfare needs.

It took the ACOs 20 minutes to collect the male animal - which is about the size of a large domestic cat - despite it being in an enclosed space.

ACO Green said: “It was a bit of a handful. Coatis have got a reputation for being pretty fierce when the need arises so there was no way we were getting our hands too close to it.” A ‘grasper’ had to be used to catch the animal safely.

Trotters Animal Park in Cockermouth, Cumbria, have taken the animal, now named Cyril, in on a short-term basis. Anyone who knows where it might have come from should contact the RSPCA on the 24 hour cruelty line 0300 1234 999. The schedule of the Dangerous Wild Animals Act 1976 was revised at the end of 2007.

A total of 33 species were removed from the list of animals that need licences including the coatis, racoons, emus, sloths and squirrel monkeys.

Six species were added including dingos and Middle Eastern thin-tailed scorpions.

http://www.whitehaven-news.co.uk/news/viewarticle.aspx?id=592480|| Re: Name that mystery beast...|BoyScoutKev|esackman@hotmail.com|02/15/08 at 02:08:38|BoyScoutKev|xx|0|198.215.16.154|And where does the mongoose fit into all of this?||